How to use your sourdough sponge.

bread making

Starting with a room temperature sourdough sponge:

If you choose to leave your sourdough sponge at room temperature and feed often, you will find that it is always ready for a recipe and the waiting time is reduced.

It is also good to leave your starter out so you get to know your sponge and its tendencies. If it seems to be getting too acidic, put it in the refrigerator. However, don’t forget to feed it once a week while in the refrigerator.

Using a refrigerated or dormant sourdough sponge

Remove your sourdough from the refrigerator. If ‘hooch’ has developed, pour it off and discard.

Measure out the required amount of sponge according to your recipe into a warm, 2-quart mixing bowl (we will call this the "baby sponge”).

Feed the mother sponge the same amount (equal parts of flour and water) that was removed for the recipe and allow it to sit in a warm area for 6-8 hours. Then return the mother sponge to the refrigerator if you wish it to be dormant.

Now add equal amounts of flour and warm water (85°F) to the baby sponge and mix well. You need to double the volume of the baby sponge. For example, if you placed 1 ½ cups of baby sponge as called for into a bowl; add 3/4 cup of flour and 3/4 cup of water. The amount of water is slightly flexible. Use only enough water to create a pancake batter texture. Cover the bowl lightly with plastic wrap and let your batter proof for 8-12 hours at 80-90°F.

The baby sponge is ready to use in a recipe when its surface is bubbly and it has a strong, pungent, sour aroma. If the aroma and flavor are not sour enough, repeat the feeding cycle again to increase acidity. This will be necessary if your starter has remained dormant for an extended amount of time without feeding.

After measuring out the amount called for in the recipe again, return the remaining baby sponge to the mother sponge in the refrigerator and stir it in.

Bakers requires an assortment of bread baking ingredients.

Sourdough

Fill Your Home with the Fresh Baked Aroma of Sourdough Bread.